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The Return of Spring The Return of Spring

The Return of Spring, painted in 1886 by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, adorns the collection of the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Nebraska. Joslyn acquired this masterpiece as a gift from Francis T.B. Martin in 1951. It stands more than 6 feet 7 inches tall and it's worth making a trip to Omaha to admire it in person. It's rumored that Bouguereau's mistress served as his inspiration for the painting. Through the years, the painting has been attacked twice, once in 1890 and again in 1976. Thankfully, only a small amount of damage resulted each time. The attackers, separated by more than 80 years, were offended by the painting's sensual nudity. We're truly dumbfounded by the 1976 attack.

Kindness forward: Joslyn Art Museum

Our Price: $480.00
American Flamingo American Flamingo

The American Flamingo is the only flamingo species native to North America, but is rarely seen in the United States anymore. Flamingos embody the saying, "you are what you eat." Their pink and reddish colors come from eating pigments found in algae and invertebrates. They're often seen standing on one leg to preserve body heat, tucking the other leg into their feathers to keep it warm. The Flamingo population is mostly affected by what happens to their habitats and breeding grounds.


Kindness forward: National Audubon Society

Our Price: $780.00
Carolina Parrots Carolina Parrots

In 1918, our world became a less colorful place with the extinction of the Carolina Parrot, also known as the Carolina Parakeet. This 12 inch long bird was frequently killed by farmers who viewed them as crop pests. Unfortunately, the Carolina Parrot made this easier for the farmers because it had the habit of gathering around their fallen comrades. Additionally, hunters killed them for them for their beautiful feathers, which was a popular hat accessory during this time. Now the Carolina Parrot serves as a stark warning for us to carefully look at how our actions affect our little friends so more species don't go the way of the Carolina Parrot.

Kindness forward: National Wildlife Federation

Our Price: $780.00
Passenger Pigeons Passenger Pigeons

In the 1800's, the population of the Passenger Pigeon numbered as high as five billion. They were the most abundant bird in North America. It is believed that the Passenger Pigeon named Martha, who died in the Cincinnati Zoo on September 1, 1914, was the very last of her kind. The main reasons for their extinction are the intense scale of their hunting, the rapid loss of their habitat, and their extremely social nature, which made them more helpless to our activities. Passenger Pigeons represent a failed conservation effort on our part because no one believed their extinction was even possible and because our efforts happened too late to save them. Five billion to extinct in 114 years.

Kindness forward: National Wildlife Federation

Our Price: $780.00
Red-shouldered Hawks Red-shouldered Hawks

Before 1900, the Red-shouldered Hawk was the one of the most common North American raptors. Since then, their population has been significantly reduced by the clearing of the wet hardwood forests they prefer. Additionally, they were affected by unchecked hunting and DDT use until conservation laws took effect in the later half of the 20th century. Also, power lines and cars routinely exact a toll on these guys. Their most common call sound is the unmistakable 'kee-aah' and are so loud that they are known as America’s most vocal hawks. Their red shoulders are visible when they're perched. Being carnivores, they feed on gophers, mice, snakes, fish, other birds, and large insects, to name a few.

Kindness forward: Sierra Club Foundation

Our Price: $780.00
Snowy Owls Snowy Owls

The ghost-like appearance of the Snowy Owl speaks of its Arctic origins. With sharp eyesight and remarkable hearing, the Snowy Owl is a patient hunter, perching and waiting to locate its prey before soaring off in pursuit. They frequently snatch their invisible quarry from under snow cover and thick vegetation. Their favorite meal is lemmings -- small mouse-like rodents, and each adult can eat more than 1,600 lemmings every year. Because the Snowy Owl is migratory, they're difficult to accurately study, but recent data indicates their population is in sharp decline. Even though the causes are not well-understood, many complex factors commonly associated with global warming seem to be in play. Snowy Owls usually mate for life and will fiercely defend their nests from all comers, even wolves.

Kindness forward: Sierra Club Foundation

Our Price: $780.00
White-headed Eagle White-headed Eagle

The White-headed Eagle, more commonly known as the Bald Eagle, is the national bird and predominant symbol of the United States of America. In the 1950's, DDT was dramatically threatening our population of these majestic birds. Through focused conservation efforts by the US government and other wildlife protection charities, the Bald Eagle was removed from the endangered and threatened species list in 2007. Although Bald Eagles have few natural enemies, threats still exist to them today, such as habitat loss. Help us protect this symbol of American patriotism for generations to come.

Kindness forward: National Audubon Society

Our Price: $780.00